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Ian Cochran

Ian Cochran

Lucio Fontana

Lucio Fontana

Jack Strange 2007

Jack Strange 2007

Trophy II, 1969. Eckhard Schene

Trophy II, 1969. Eckhard Schene

Marseis (Phobos), 2008. Björn Dahlem

Marseis (Phobos), 2008. Björn Dahlem

Ebony and Ivory, 2009. Rice pudding and chocolate in toilets. Bert Rodriguez

Ebony and Ivory, 2009. Rice pudding and chocolate in toilets. Bert Rodriguez

Reticulárea. Gego (Gertrude Goldschmidt)

Reticulárea. Gego (Gertrude Goldschmidt)

Stay III, 2012. 6mm Square Key Steel. Antony Gormley

Stay III, 2012. 6mm Square Key Steel. Antony Gormley

Haze, 2003. Stacked Clear Plastic Drinking Straws. Tara Donovan

Concavo-Convesso, 1946. Bruno Munari

At the end of the 1940s Bruno Munari created a work-environment. In a dark and possibly ‘white cube’-style room, light radiated through a piece of industrial metal mesh, folded according to a mathematical precept: a work Munari entitled Concave-convex. The object, moved only by air currents or the touch of the visitor, created moiré patterns not only within itself but – most importantly for Munari – cast a complex, dynamic and mutable image onto the walls. The object was a two-dimensional square, curved in such a manner as to become three-dimensional, and expanded to infinity through the shadows that were thrown into the surrounding environment, suggesting the notion of the curvature of space. The obvious relationship of this object with the principles of non-Euclidean geometry did not lessen the atmosphere of mystery that permeated the environment, created by a skilful juxtaposition of form and structure, shadow and light.

Trauma, 2007. Katja Strunz

Trauma, 2007. Katja Strunz

kiameku:

Matthew Buckingham Burglar Alarm 2007 Wood, nails, and glue 55.1 x 34.6 x 60.2 inches / 140 x 88 x 153 cm
—
Until the end of the 19th century house-builders and stair carpenters  occasionally included a passive “alarm” system in the homes they built —a “trip-step” rising a few inches higher than the other steps—that  would cause an unwary and unknowing intruder to stumble in the night  and awaken slumbering occupants. The idea was adapted from an  earlier military defense strategy used by medieval stone masons who  constructed uneven steps in castle stairwells hoping to thwart invading  foreign armies.

kiameku:

Matthew Buckingham
Burglar Alarm
2007
Wood, nails, and glue
55.1 x 34.6 x 60.2 inches / 140 x 88 x 153 cm

Until the end of the 19th century house-builders and stair carpenters
occasionally included a passive “alarm” system in the homes they built
—a “trip-step” rising a few inches higher than the other steps—that
would cause an unwary and unknowing intruder to stumble in the night
and awaken slumbering occupants. The idea was adapted from an
earlier military defense strategy used by medieval stone masons who
constructed uneven steps in castle stairwells hoping to thwart invading
foreign armies.

andrewharlow:

Alex FarrarEn Plein Air, 2009Tissue paper, straws, balsa wood, bin linets, helium

andrewharlow:

Alex Farrar
En Plein Air, 2009
Tissue paper, straws, balsa wood, bin linets, helium

HENRIQUE OLIVEIRA

Henrique Oliveira was born in Ourinhos, Brazil in 1973. He received a BFA in painting in 2004 and a Masters in Visual Poetics in 2007 from the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Oliveira has exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Brazil and in 2008 participated in Something from Nothing, an invitational exhibition organized by the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. He lives and works in São Paulo.

Oliveira uses tapumes, which in Portuguese can mean “fencing,” “boarding,” or “enclosure,” as a title for many of his large-scale installations. The term makes reference to the temporary wooden construction fences seen throughout the city of São Paulo where Oliveira lives. It also refers to the weathered wood Oliveira uses as the primary material in his installations. Early on, Oliveira experimented with the surfaces of his paintings by gluing newspaper onto a canvas and scraping it, or mixing sand with the paint. A breakthrough occurred while he was a student at the University of São Paulo, where for two years the view from his studio window was a wooden construction fence. Over time Oliveira began to see the deterioration of the wood and its separation into multiple layers and colors as similar to the process of painting. One week before the final student show opened, the construction was finished and the worn out plywood fence was discarded. Oliveira collected the wood and used it in his first installation.

Oliveira’s installations, which he refers to as “tridimensionals,” have evolved into massive, spatial constructions that combine painting, architecture, and sculpture. In some installations he uses walls as supports, attaching and shaping lengths of PVC tubing to create enormous, protruding forms over which he layers thin sheets of wood. In others, he arranges thousands of pieces of painted wood into gestural abstract “paintings” that spill off the wall into the viewer’s space. The constants in Oliveira’s work are the visual and tactile qualities of wood that has been exposed to the elements, and though he incorporates new, flexible plywood into his work, his primary material remains the discarded wood collected on the streets of São Paulo.