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Romualdas Rakauskas, 1981

Romualdas Rakauskas, 1981

It’s about vagabonding, sitting down under a tree anywhere. It’s about wandering in the universe by yourself: you will start looking again. The conventional world puts a veil over your eyes, it’s a matter of taking it off during your time as a photographer.

—Sergio Larrain
Great Britain. ENGLAND. London. The City, 1958-1959. Sergio Larrain

Great Britain. ENGLAND. London. The City, 1958-1959. Sergio Larrain

CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Sergio Larrain

CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Sergio Larrain

Left: CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Right: CHILE. Eastern Island, 1961.

A notoriously reclusive artist, Sergio Larrain has nonetheless become a touchstone for those who have come to know and love his work, including authors Roberto Bolaño and Julio Cortázar. His images have left generations of viewers in awe of the simultaneous serenity and spontaneity that a camera can capture—when placed, that is, in the hands of an artist with such rare meditative passion. “A good image is born from a state of grace,” the artist once explained.

Sergio Larrain (1931–2012, born in Valparaiso, Chile) grew up in Chile, but left at age eighteen to study at the University of California, Berkeley. Upon his return he began taking photographs in the streets of Santiago and Valparaiso; the early purchase of two images by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, reassured him in his chosen profession. Impressed by Henri Cartier-Bresson’s photographs, Larrain presented the photographer his work on los abandonados (street children in Santiago) during a trip to Europe. Cartier-Bresson then invited Larrain to join Magnum in 1960; around this time he also began what would become a legendary project on Valparaiso with a text by poet Pablo Neruda. Unsure if he was suited to working for the press, Larrain retreated to the Chilean countryside and dedicated himself to yoga, meditation, and drawing until his death in February 2012.

East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain
Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.
Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain

Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.

Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

THE DUDE TAKES PICTURES

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For more than twenty years, on dozens of film sets, Jeff Bridges has perfected his own photography, shooting between takes and behind-the-scenes with a Widelux F8 camera. This fascinating, surprisingly candid body of work began as a personal project, as he recorded the arduous, emotionally intense, evanescent work of the film shoot in books that were privately printed and given as gifts to cast and crew. These are not traditional “Hollywood” pictures, but rather—despite the costumes and lighting, the crowds of extras, the stardom of the subjects—pictures of friends at work. Taken together, the pictures act as Bridges’ personal and professional diary, with actors, directors, and crew appearing as coworkers, all equal participants in the job at hand.

The photos have been comprised into a book, "Pictures," where proceeds will be donated to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, a non-profit organization that offers charitable care and support to film-industry workers.

Dunes (2013)

Dunes (2013)

Ants (People Ruin Everything) (2013)

Ants (People Ruin Everything) (2013)

Cold (2013)

Cold (2013)

Death Valley (2013)

Death Valley (2013)