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Ian Cochran

Ian Cochran

Lucio Fontana

Lucio Fontana

Romualdas Rakauskas, 1981

Romualdas Rakauskas, 1981

Great Britain. ENGLAND. London. The City, 1958-1959. Sergio Larrain

Great Britain. ENGLAND. London. The City, 1958-1959. Sergio Larrain

CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Sergio Larrain

CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Sergio Larrain

Left: CHILE. Valparaiso, 1963. Right: CHILE. Eastern Island, 1961.

A notoriously reclusive artist, Sergio Larrain has nonetheless become a touchstone for those who have come to know and love his work, including authors Roberto Bolaño and Julio Cortázar. His images have left generations of viewers in awe of the simultaneous serenity and spontaneity that a camera can capture—when placed, that is, in the hands of an artist with such rare meditative passion. “A good image is born from a state of grace,” the artist once explained.

Sergio Larrain (1931–2012, born in Valparaiso, Chile) grew up in Chile, but left at age eighteen to study at the University of California, Berkeley. Upon his return he began taking photographs in the streets of Santiago and Valparaiso; the early purchase of two images by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, reassured him in his chosen profession. Impressed by Henri Cartier-Bresson’s photographs, Larrain presented the photographer his work on los abandonados (street children in Santiago) during a trip to Europe. Cartier-Bresson then invited Larrain to join Magnum in 1960; around this time he also began what would become a legendary project on Valparaiso with a text by poet Pablo Neruda. Unsure if he was suited to working for the press, Larrain retreated to the Chilean countryside and dedicated himself to yoga, meditation, and drawing until his death in February 2012.

East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain
Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.
Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain

Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.

Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

…Always take yourself seriously… it’s not the same as being pompous, or overly self-assured, but it is important to understand that the small little ideas that creep up in your mind, often contain the germ of a much larger project. All great art wasn’t born as great art. It was first needed to be recognised by the artist him/herself. Through his or her belief in it, it became true…Always spend a lot of time closely observing things, studying the surface of the world as that is always the visual point of departure.

—Wolfgang Tillmans

Deep Throat, 1996. Mona Hatoum

Sous tension, 1999. Mona Hatoum
Mona Hatoum (born 1952 in Beirut, Lebanon) is a video artist and installation artist of Palestinian origin, who lives in London. Hatoum’s poetic and political oeuvre is realised in a diverse and often unconventional range of media, including installations, sculpture, video, photography and works on paper.
Hatoum started her career making visceral video and performance work in the 1980s that focused with great intensity on the body. Since the beginning of the 1990s, her work moved increasingly towards large-scale installations that aim to engage the viewer in conflicting emotions of desire and revulsion, fear and fascination. In her singular sculptures, Hatoum has transformed familiar, every-day, domestic objects such as chairs, cots and kitchen utensils into things foreign, threatening and dangerous. Even the human body is rendered strange in works such as Corps étranger (1994) or Deep Throat (1996), installations that use endoscopic journeys through the interior landscape of the artist’s own body. In Homebound (2000) and Sous Tension (1999) Hatoum uses an assemblage of household furniture wired up with an audibly active electric current – combine a sense of threat with a surrealist sense of humour to create works that draw the viewer in on both an emotive and intellectual level. In smaller sculptures such as Traffic (2004) and Twins (2006) Hatoum uses found materials, rich with patina and laden with personal resonance, to create poetic, beguiling works on an intimate scale.

Sous tension, 1999. Mona Hatoum

Mona Hatoum (born 1952 in Beirut, Lebanon) is a video artist and installation artist of Palestinian origin, who lives in London. Hatoum’s poetic and political oeuvre is realised in a diverse and often unconventional range of media, including installations, sculpture, video, photography and works on paper.

Hatoum started her career making visceral video and performance work in the 1980s that focused with great intensity on the body. Since the beginning of the 1990s, her work moved increasingly towards large-scale installations that aim to engage the viewer in conflicting emotions of desire and revulsion, fear and fascination. In her singular sculptures, Hatoum has transformed familiar, every-day, domestic objects such as chairs, cots and kitchen utensils into things foreign, threatening and dangerous. Even the human body is rendered strange in works such as Corps étranger (1994) or Deep Throat (1996), installations that use endoscopic journeys through the interior landscape of the artist’s own body. In Homebound (2000) and Sous Tension (1999) Hatoum uses an assemblage of household furniture wired up with an audibly active electric current – combine a sense of threat with a surrealist sense of humour to create works that draw the viewer in on both an emotive and intellectual level. In smaller sculptures such as Traffic (2004) and Twins (2006) Hatoum uses found materials, rich with patina and laden with personal resonance, to create poetic, beguiling works on an intimate scale.

Demostrar (Res) III, 2010. Ignasi Aballí

Demostrar (Res) III, 2010. Ignasi Aballí

Rationed Water, 2013. Hydrophobic coating, Tempered Glass, Water, Plastic Bottles, Fierce Apple Gatorade, Blueberry-Pomegranate Gatorade, 58 ⅛ x 33 ½ x 20”

Rationed Water, 2013. Hydrophobic coating, Tempered Glass, Water, Plastic Bottles, Fierce Apple Gatorade, Blueberry-Pomegranate Gatorade, 58 ⅛ x 33 ½ x 20”