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Why do farmers farm, given their economic adversities on top of the many frustrations and difficulties normal to farming? And always the answer is: “Love. They must do it for the love.” Farmers farm for the love of farming. They love to watch and nurture the growth of plants. They love to live in the presence of animals. They love to work outdoors. They love the weather, maybe even when it is making them miserable. They love to live where they work and to work where they live. If the scale of their farming is small enough, they like to work in the company of their children and with the help of their children. They love the measure of independence that farm life can still provide. I have an idea that a lot of farmers have gone to a lot of trouble merely to be self-employed, to live at least a part of their lives without a boss.

—Wendell Berry

Call them members of the permanent intern underclass: educated members of the millennial generation who are locked out of the traditional career ladder and are having to settle for two, three and sometimes more internships after graduating college, all with no end in sight.

Millennials Feel Trapped in a Cycle of Internships With Little Pay and No Job Offers

Artist: Arcade Fire
Title: Song on the Beach
Album: Her Original Motion Picture Soundtrack


I’ve never been lonely. I’ve been in a room—I’ve felt suicidal. I’ve been depressed. I’ve felt awful—awful beyond all—but I never felt that one other person could enter that room and cure what was bothering me…or that any number of people could enter that room. In other words, loneliness is something I’ve never been bothered with because I’ve always had this terrible itch for solitude. It’s being at a party, or at a stadium full of people cheering for something, that I might feel loneliness. I’ll quote Ibsen, “The strongest men are the most alone.” I’ve never thought, “Well, some beautiful blonde will come in here and give me a fuck-job, rub my balls, and I’ll feel good.” No, that won’t help. You know the typical crowd, “Wow, it’s Friday night, what are you going to do? Just sit there?” Well, yeah. Because there’s nothing out there. It’s stupidity. Stupid people mingling with stupid people. Let them stupidify themselves. I’ve never been bothered with the need to rush out into the night. I hid in bars, because I didn’t want to hide in factories. That’s all. Sorry for all the millions, but I’ve never been lonely. I like myself. I’m the best form of entertainment I have. Let’s drink more wine!

—Charles Bukowski

Artist: Arcade Fire
Title: Porno
Album: Reflektor


East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

East Town Theatre Exterior, 2012. Philip Jarmain

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain
Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.
Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

Lee Plaza Hotel, 2011. Philip Jarmain

Photographer Philip Jarmain captures the rapid destruction of Detroit’s early Twentieth-century architecture in his latest show at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco. In this project, American Beauty, Jarmain captures these images using a large format camera. “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures,” says Jarmain.

Detroit has had an unprecedented impact on the industrial age and the modern world, and was even once called “The Paris of the Midwest.” In 2009, the US recession hit Detroit like a second Great Depression. The population dropped, unemployment rates rocketed. The majority of these pre-Depression era buildings are being destroyed at an exponential rate as they lie victim to scrappers and vandals. Despite these events Detroit—Motown—remains a cultural powerhouse.

…Always take yourself seriously… it’s not the same as being pompous, or overly self-assured, but it is important to understand that the small little ideas that creep up in your mind, often contain the germ of a much larger project. All great art wasn’t born as great art. It was first needed to be recognised by the artist him/herself. Through his or her belief in it, it became true…Always spend a lot of time closely observing things, studying the surface of the world as that is always the visual point of departure.

—Wolfgang Tillmans